About Addiction

Addiction has many faces and facets. Below is an overview of some of the many dangerous addictions facing our community today.

The coexistence of both a mental health and a substance use disorder is referred to as co-occurring disorders. Co-occurring disorders were previously referred to as dual diagnoses.

In many cases, people receive treatment for one disorder while the other disorder remains untreated.  

This may occur because both mental and substance use disorders can have biological, psychological, and social components. Other reasons may be inadequate provider training or screening, an overlap of symptoms, or that other health issues need to be addressed first. In any case, the consequences of undiagnosed, untreated, or undertreated co-occurring disorders can lead to a higher likelihood of experiencing homelessness, incarceration, medical illnesses, suicide, or even early death.

A few eye-opening statistics

Teens who consistently learn about the risks of drugs from their caregivers or parents are up to

50% less likely

to use drugs than those who don’t.

People with

mental health disorders

are more likely than people without mental health disorders to experience an alcohol or substance use disorder.

50% of high school seniors

do not think it’s harmful to try crack or cocaine once or twice and

40% believe

it’s not harmful to use heroin once or twice.

Early detection and treatment

can improve treatment outcomes and the quality of life for those who need these services.

Teens who consistently learn about the risks of drugs from their caregivers or parents are up to

50% less likely

to use drugs than those who don’t.

50% of high school seniors

do not think it’s harmful to try crack or cocaine once or twice and

40% believe

it’s not harmful to use heroin once or twice.

People with

mental health disorders

are more likely than people without mental health disorders to experience an alcohol or substance use disorder.

Early detection and treatment

can improve treatment outcomes and the quality of life for those who need these services.

Teens who consistently learn about the risks of drugs from their caregivers or parents are up to

50% less likely

to use drugs than those who don’t.

50% of high school seniors

do not think it’s harmful to try crack or cocaine once or twice and

40% believe

it’s not harmful to use heroin once or twice.

People with

mental health disorders

are more likely than people without mental health disorders to experience an alcohol or substance use disorder.

People with

mental health disorders

are more likely than people without mental health disorders to experience an alcohol or substance use disorder.

Early detection and treatment

can improve treatment outcomes and the quality of life for those who need these services.